Mayroyd Mill - Derelict Manchester:

Derelict Manchester:

A view of the hidden parts around the inner sections around the city centre of Manchester, UK and beyond . How you perceive these derelict sites could be morbid, yet exciting.

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Mayroyd Mill

 Mayroyd Mill, Hebden Bridge, West Yorkshire:

Brief History:

Situated on the banks of the River Calder and close to Hebden Bridge railway station, previously known as Wadsworth and also Gemland mill.The site can be traced back as far as 1429, when it was used as a corn mill. Later in the early part of the 19th century it was used as a saw mill, then was used in the 20th century for the manufacture of egg boxes. It was damaged by fire on 4th March 1932 and burned down in 1936 then was derelict for some time, up until 2004 when the part of the remaining structures were converted into flats.. In addition, the other part of the mill is also a storage yard and stone reclamation company.. 

Previous Owners include

Owners and tenants of the mill have included

James Law [1794]

Lambert Barnes [1800]

William Wheelhouse [1802, 1834]

Champion Murgatroyd [1845]

John Murgatroyd [1872]

William Barker & Company [1905, 1939]

Bannister Halstead & Company [1905]

Mark King & Son [1905]


<img src="Mayroyd Mill.jpeg" alt=" image of sluice gate wheels" />

<img src="Mayroyd Mill.jpeg" alt=" image of the ruined wall near Hebden Bridge" />



<img src="Mayroyd Mill.jpeg" alt=" image of the ruined wall near Hebden Bridge" />
Part of the sluice gate mechanism...
<img src="Mayroyd Mill.jpeg" alt=" image catchment lodge Hebden Bridge" />




<img src="Mayroyd Mill.jpeg" alt=" image of the ruined mill near Hebden Bridge" />

<img src="Mayroyd Mill.jpeg" alt=" image of the ruined mill near Hebden Bridge" />



In 2001 , the waterwheel was enclosed inside a purpose built stone structure which holds the remaining parts of the wheel..

<img src="Mayroyd Mill.jpeg" alt=" image of the ruined mill near Hebden Bridge" />

<img src="Mayroyd Mill.jpeg" alt=" image of the ruined mill near Hebden Bridge" />

<img src="Mayroyd Mill.jpeg" alt=" image of the ruined mill near Hebden Bridge" />

<img src="Mayroyd Mill.jpeg" alt=" image of the waterwheel near Hebden Bridge" />









<img src="Mayroyd Mill.jpeg" alt=" image of the ruined mill near Hebden Bridge" />

Technical Information

Wheelhouse to mill (now demolished), early C19. Hammer-dressed stone, stone slate roof survives in part, one end of roof clad in asbestos, over a wooden extension. East elevation has a central doorway with window to either side with plain stone surrounds. Left hand return wall has 2 similar windows in gable which overlooks the river Calder. Rear has a large semicircular arched entrance to sluice. Interior houses a cast iron and steel undershot wheel 16 feet diameter, 15 feet wide. The weir, set diagonally across the river, is low and buttressed.

Attached to the wheelhouse, where the water is discharged from the wheel, is an arched stone culvert which returns the water to the river. This culvert is dressed stone, with a simple rounded arch profile, 5 metres wide and 2 metres high above the present water level. It stretches 440 metres, with a nearly flat gradient, dropping only 0.2 metres in its entire length.

source from https://historicengland.org.uk/

On the opposite side of the river , I came across these structures...

<img src="Mayroyd Mill.jpeg" alt=" image of the ruined wall near Hebden Bridge" />

<img src="Mayroyd Mill.jpeg" alt=" image of the ruined wall near Hebden Bridge" />

<img src="Mayroyd Mill.jpeg" alt=" image of the ruined wall near Hebden Bridge" />


<img src="Mayroyd Mill.jpeg" alt=" image of the ruined wall near Hebden Bridge" />

<img src="Mayroyd Mill.jpeg" alt=" image of the ruined wall near Hebden Bridge" />

<img src="Mayroyd Mill.jpeg" alt=" image of the ruined wall near Hebden Bridge" />


<img src="Mayroyd Mill.jpeg" alt=" image of the ruined wall near Hebden Bridge" />














2 comments:

  1. Brilliant and really interesting photos, well done. Such a shame to see it in that state of course, but it’s also rather picturesque… I never hang meself :) :) Can’t make up my mind.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you for the kind feedback, much appreciated...👍

    ReplyDelete