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A view of the hidden parts around the inner sections around the city centre of Manchester UK and beyond. How you perceive these derelict sites could be a sort of morbid fascination, or logically analysing the modes and functionally of the remaining fragments of architecture. This blog is the stage 1 of 'Urban Exploration' but I have to emphasise, if you visit these places and tempted to gain access..I wouldnt advise it unless you seek permission from the appropriate authorities.

Pinner Quarry Stone Mines

 


Mining in the UK Pinner Quarry Rossendale Lancashire

The structure, like most of the other stone quarries in the region used ‘pillar and stall’  is  a mining system in which the mined material is extracted across a horizontal plane, creating horizontal arrays of rooms and pillars. To do this, "rooms" of ore are dug out while "pillars" of untouched material are left to support the roof overburden. Calculating the size, shape, and position of pillars is a complicated procedure, and is an area of active research. The technique is usually used for relatively flat-lying deposits, such as those that follow a particular stratum. Room and pillar mining can be advantageous because it reduces the risk of surface subsidence compared to other underground mining technique.

Mining in the UK Pinner Quarry Rossendale Lancashire

Mining in the UK Pinner Quarry Rossendale Lancashire

Mining in the UK Pinner Quarry Rossendale Lancashire

Mining in the UK Pinner Quarry Rossendale Lancashire
The stone worked from the quarry was from the Haslingden Flagstone. The stone quarried from here was widely sought after for its properties and was used for building, flags, setts and engine beds. Another source also highlighted that the operation only used five men, and horses with sledge to remove the stone form the mine.
Mining in the UK Pinner Quarry Rossendale Lancashire


Mining in the UK Pinner Quarry Rossendale Lancashire
Historical Summary:

Working Life: opened 1841 (Davies 1985-96). Disused by 1923 (OS 1925 6” geology map).

Quarry Firms: Butterworth and Brooks, later Brooks and Brooks (1878), Richard Wyld (pre 1892), Ormerod Ashworth (1892). An inspector return shows only five men employed ( Davies 1985-96).

Geology: Lower Haslingden Flags ( Davies 1985 -96).

Methods: hillside outcropping and mining. Stone sought was the band nearest the floor, shaley rock above was removed to access and loosen it (Davies 1985 – 96).

Products: building stone, flags, setts, engine beds ( Davies 1985-96).

The quarry is on Lancashire’s SMR (Sites and Monuments Registar) number 7965.







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